Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for The Bookish Outsider: 5 Writing Commandments to Live By

Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for The Bookish Outsider: 5 Writing Commandments to Live By

 

Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for Unforgivable by Mike Thomas! Unforgivable is the second in the Will MacReady series, about a detective working in Cardiff and following on from Ash And Bones. Here’s Mike to talk about some excellent writing commandments and don’t forget to look out for my review coming later on today.

 

5 Writing Commandments to Live By

Every writer has Things That Work For Them. Y’know, those rituals and self-imposed guidelines and downright oddball things they do just to get a couple of pages out during a working day. Some author chums don’t wash much and live – surrounded by coffee cups and cigarette butts and a cat – in their PJs. Nabokov and Hemingway used to write standing up. Hell, Dan Brown whacks on a pair of gravity boots and hangs upside down just to get in the right frame of mind for typing about stolen maps and Jesus and old stuff with dusty clues on.

Personally, I like to wear as little clothing as possible, but we won’t get into that too much as it involves skimpy underwear, nipple tassels, and mood music. Instead, here’s five slightly more palatable suggestions for successful writing…

Get Those Pesky Words Out

Your magnum opus ain’t going to write itself, so aim for 1,000 words a day, minimum. Sit down, stop being all tortured artist – ‘I can’t work in these conditions!’ *checks Twitter for the 37th time that morning* – and do some work, because that is what writing a novel is: work. It isyour job. Even if you don’t hit that magical 1k (and why not?) at least you’ll have something on the page. Something is better than The Flashing Cursor of Uselessness….

To continue reading, click here

 

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Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for Bloomin’ Brilliant Books: The Three Favourite Supporting Characters in My Novels

Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for Bloomin’ Brilliant Books: The Three Favourite Supporting Characters in My Novels

About Bloomin’ Brilliant Books

My name is Abbie and I’m a Yorkshire lass. I love Alaskan Malamutes, rock music and, of course, books.

Bloomin’ Brilliant Books was set up in 2016 to connect with other readers  and share great books, to support authors and publishers, and to have my reviews all in one accessible place to help me remember the books I have read and loved (I have the memory span of a goldfish!). The blog has steadily grown and I was delighted to have won the Best Newcomer in 2017’s Annual Blogger’s Bash awards.

Blog Tour – Unforgivable by Mike Thomas *Guest Post and Review*

 

 

 

 

 

Today I am taking part in the blog tour for Unforgivable by Mike Thomas. I’m chuffed to bits to be a part of this and to be sharing my review AND I have a brilliant guest post from Mike on his three favourite supporting characters in his novels. I will hand you over to Mike and then check out the blurb and my review of Unforgivable…

The Three Favourite Supporting Characters in My Novels

It’s always enjoyable writing your protagonist’s story and pushing them around on the page – go here, you swine! – but what I often find more entertaining, certainly if my hero or heroine is having an off day, is writing supporting characters. They’re often great fun, because they’re not really as important (but they’re still very important), and therefore the pressure’s off and there’s more freedom to do things with them that you couldn’t do with your main character. They also act as a counterpoint to your protagonist, and a means to demonstrate your main character’s personality or behaviour without doing the old ‘telling’.

Just look at Saul Goodman in ‘Breaking Bad’, or Bunk in ‘The Wire’, or The Mad Hatter in Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’. And what about Ron and Hermione in the Potter books? All of them, fully-formed and interesting supporting characters that add further depth and shade to the protagonist and the story itself.

So who are the three favourite supporting characters in my novels? Which of them were the most interesting and gratifying to write? Let’s take a look…

1. DC Warren Harrison – rotund, perpetually eating and wrapped in a fug of smoke, ‘Wazza’ is the ‘senior man’ – in age, not rank – on the team of CID officers who feature in the MacReady novels, ‘Ash and Bones’ and ‘Unforgivable’. An old sweat who has seen it all…

 

To continue reading (and to see Abbie’s review), click here

 

Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for Col’s Criminal Library: Failing at Your First Book Signing!

Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for Col’s Criminal Library: Failing at Your First Book Signing!

COL S CRIMINAL LIBRARY MIKE THOMAS UNFORGIVABLE BLOG TOURAbout Col’s Criminal Library

Interests books, books, books, bit of TV – Justified, Homeland, The WIRE, football – Luton,Celtic, REP.of Ireland, sleeping
Favourite Films LA Confidential, Fargo, Big Lebowski, Burn After Reading
Favourite Music Them Crooked Vultures, Stone Temple Pilots, Pearl Jam, Stereophonics, Ocean Colour Scene, Linkin Park, Nickelback

 

Thursday, 27 July 2017

MIKE THOMAS – UNFORGIVABLE – BLOG TOUR

Emily from publisher Bonnier Zaffre and author Mike Thomas have kindly asked me to participate in the blog tour to publicise his latest book – UNFORGIVABLE

Unforgivable is the second book in his DC Will MacReady series and is out this month.

The first, Ash and Bones (as well as his two standalone novels Pocket Notebook and Ugly Bus) still languish on the burgeoning TBR pile………UNFORGIVABLE really!

The blurb…….

A dark slice of Cardiff crime for fans of TONY PARSONS, JAMES OSWALD and LUCA VESTE. There isn’t always a welcome in the valleys . . . Bombs detonate in a busy souk, causing massive devastation. An explosion rips apart a mosque, killing and injuring those inside. But this isn’t the Middle East – this is Cardiff . . . In a city where tensions are already running high, DC Will MacReady and his colleagues begin the desperate hunt for the attacker. If they knew the ‘why’, then surely they can find the ‘who’? But that isn’t so easy, and time is fast running out . . . MacReady is still trying to prove himself after the horrific events of the previous year, which left his sergeant injured and his job in jeopardy, so he feels sidelined when he’s asked to investigate a vicious knife attack on a young woman. But all is not as it seems with his new case, and soon MacReady must put everything on the line in order to do what is right.


Mike has kindly written a guest post for the blog….

Failing at Your First Book Signing!

Book signings, eh?

You’ve probably seen the photos: Lee Child smiling and scribbling his autograph, queue snaking out of the door. Or Jo Rowling, the local cops shutting down a street so the huge crowd of Potter-mad children can glimpse their favourite author in the flesh for just a few moments.

It’s always the same for us authors. Great fun, and so busy, seeing the people who’ve waited patiently for a couple of hours, in lines that weave around the store’s shelves, so many of them that you can barely…

Oh, wait. It’s not always the same. Nope. Oh no.

Let me tell you about my first book signing.

Picture it: several years ago, a sunny spring day, unseasonably warm. A Saturday afternoon in Cardiff, the Welsh capital buzzing, the first street fair of the year in full swing, lots of events and stalls and people swarming towards them.

So in I go, into the Bookshop I Shall Not Name for my first ever two hour signing session – oh, how excited I was! – for my debut novel, ‘Pocket Notebook’, a darkly comedic tale of a police officer’s downfall. A member of staff greets me and she smiles and points me at my table with all its books (copies of my book, woo!) and a chair and a pen and it looks so lovely then she wanders off and carries on stocking the shelves.

To continue reading, click here

 

Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for Book Drunk: How Real Life Became More Frightening than the Fictional Events in ‘Unforgivable’ 

Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for Book Drunk: How Real Life Became More Frightening than the Fictional Events in ‘Unforgivable’ 

About Book Drunk

Hello, I’m Sophie.
Book Drunk (formerly Reviewed the Book) is an award-winning book blog. I post reviews, author interviews, guest posts, giveaways and various other book related posts from cover reveals to excerpts.
Hello, I'm Sophie. Book Drunk (formerly Reviewed the Book) is an award-winning book blog. I post reviews, author interviews, guest posts, giveaways and various other book related posts from cover reveals to excerpts.

 

Guest Post | How Real Life Became More Frightening than Fiction by Mike Thomas (Unforgivable)

Published by Zaffre on July 27, 2017

 

How Real Life Became More Frightening than the Fictional Events in ‘Unforgivable’ 

What if the unreal became real?

What if something you were planning to write, something so extreme and preposterous and troubling, became – during the creation of the novel – the horrifying new normal?

I’d had a story idea rattling around my addled brain for some time: what if, against a backdrop of racial tensions in the UK city of Cardiff, a lone white male decided to attack an ethnic market then blow up a mosque? What if this was our very own Anders Behring Breivik moment, or David Copeland all over again, targeting people with nail bombs and firearms and remote-detonated homemade explosive devices? But what if I dialled it up to eleven, really pushing the devastation, the insanity?

And what if these attacks paralysed an entire city? Brought the populace of a cosmopolitan west European capital to its knees, and stretched its emergency services – already fraying at the seams during an ongoing case of racially-motivated murder – to breaking point? How would the police respond to such a meticulously planned and vicious series of events where hundreds of people were left dying or dead?

I thought I’d find out. It was in the early summer of 2015 that I finally began writing, hacking away at an opening chapter – the market scene, where the attacker strides in and begins setting off IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices) – that was designed to get the heart thumping. That was designed to leave you open-mouthed at its conclusion, reeling at what you had just read….

Continue reading…

Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for Bibliomaniac: Crime series or standalone novels – which are easier to write?

Unforgivable Blog Tour – Guest Post for Bibliomaniac: Crime series or standalone novels – which are easier to write?

About Bibliomanic

My name is Katherine Sunderland and I’m a book maniac who grabs every spare (and sometimes not so spare) moment to devour the next big read. Helping people get a regular fix of top books, reviews and all things bookish.

BiblioManiac Unforgivable MikeThomas BlogTour GuestPost

#Unforgivable #MikeThomas #BlogTour #GuestPost

I am absolutely thrilled to welcome Mike Thomas to my blog today! Mike’s novel, Unforgivable is published by Bonnier Zaffre on July 27th 2017. Here’s a bit about it to wet your appetite!

Bombs detonate in a busy souk, causing massive devastation.
An explosion rips apart a mosque, killing and injuring those inside.
But this isn’t the Middle East – this is Cardiff . . .

In a city where tensions are already running high, DC Will MacReady and his colleagues begin the desperate hunt for the attacker. If they knew the ‘why’, then surely they can find the ‘who’? But that isn’t so easy, and time is fast running out . . .

MacReady is still trying to prove himself after the horrific events of the previous year, which left his sergeant injured and his job in jeopardy, so he feels sidelined when he’s asked to investigate a vicious knife attack on a young woman.

But all is not as it seems with his new case, and soon MacReady must put everything on the line in order to do what is right.

So without any more delay, I’m going to hand straight over to Mike for his guest post written just for BibliomaniacUK!

Crime series or standalone novels – which are easier to write?

Entertainment, and how we consume it and what form it comes in, is changing. Cinema is no longer king, and actors who just ten years ago wouldn’t entertain an appearance on the small screen are increasingly turning to television, with its rich, long-form storylines and returning series – fuelled by the likes of Netflix and Amazon – proving incredibly appealing.

Yet in the book world, certainly where genre novel series once ruled the roost, it seems in the last few years there has been a shift in the opposite direction: a massive increase in the popularity of standalones. I recently spoke to Sarah Hilary, author of the brilliant Marnie Rome novels, and she told me that even established ‘series’ authors are being pushed by their agents and publishers to write standalone crime or psychological thrillers.

‘Gone Girl’, it appears, still reverberates…

To continue reading, click here

 

BlogTour | BookReview: Unforgivable by Mike Thomas

BlogTour | BookReview: Unforgivable by Mike Thomas

Hello. My name is Emma and damppebbles is my baby. I’m in my…ahem…late thirties and live in South Oxfordshire with my husband and two young children (my 3 year old son gives me a run for my money in the book loving stakes).

Emma says: “… Quite possibly my favourite guest post, EVER!  Seriously, how good was that?  I thoroughly enjoyed reading your post, Mike.  My thanks for such an interesting true crime/crime fiction focused piece!…”

damppebbles.com

Unforgivable.jpg“Bombs detonate in a busy souk, causing massive devastation.
An explosion rips apart a mosque, killing and injuring those inside.
But this isn’t the Middle East – this is Cardiff . . .

In a city where tensions are already running high, DC Will MacReady and his colleagues begin the desperate hunt for the attacker. If they knew the ‘why’, then surely they can find the ‘who’? But that isn’t so easy, and time is fast running out . . .

MacReady is still trying to prove himself after the horrific events of the previous year, which left his sergeant injured and his job in jeopardy, so he feels sidelined when he’s asked to investigate a vicious knife attack on a young woman.

But all is not as it seems with his new case, and soon MacReady must put everything on the line in order to do what is right.”

View original post 2,643 more words

Tall Oaks by Chris Whitaker – Reviewed by Mike Thomas

Tall Oaks by Chris Whitaker – Reviewed by Mike Thomas

Three-year-old Harry Monroe is missing, snatched from his bed while his mother, Jess – heartbroken and crumbling, having recently been abandoned by her husband – lay sleepless upstairs. This, in a fraught, deliciously creepy opening chapter, introduces us to the small-town Americana of Tall Oaks: a place of sunny smiles and white picket fences straight out of a Norman Rockwell painting, but where if you scratch the surface there are terrible things to be found. And Chris Whitaker scratches, all right. All, as the saying goes, is not as it seems.

Let’s get it out of the way: Tall Oaks is an extraordinary debut. A novel a seasoned, ‘big name’ author would be proud to have produced. The writing is carefully-crafted and assured, with not a word wasted. It provides depth and life, light and shade, to the characters and the town itself, both of which are skilfully drawn by Whitaker – Tall Oaks and its inhabitants live and breathe inside the covers of this novel, and it was a wrench to leave the place behind. This is the true test of a good book – do the characters stay with you long after the last page has been read, do you want to spend more time with them and find out what they are doing? Tall Oaks achieves this, and then some.

The novel’s diverse set of characters – from the aforementioned Jess, hurtling towards the brink, to the taciturn, damaged police chief Jim Young, to the laugh-out-loud and awfully, thrillingly profane Manny – provide richness to support the propulsive narrative, and Whitaker achieves a delicate balance (no mean feat) of the comedic and the suspenseful. It is shot through with a wonderful sense of humour, but there is darkness and profound sadness here too, often tugging at the coat-tails of the myriad jokes and funny scenes that pepper the pages. We do not forget what horror brought us to Tall Oaks, and the fate of Harry Monroe is never far from our thoughts – especially as we build towards a climax that is as moving as it is shocking.

Tall Oaks has invited favourable comparisons to ‘Fargo’ or ‘Twin Peaks’ – there are tonal echoes of ‘Blue Velvet’ and ‘Blood Simple’ in the mix, too, as well as Hitchcock’s ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ – and these are well deserved, but should not divert attention from what Whitaker has achieved here. While nodding to these classics, he has crafted something special and of itself. This is no mere homage or photocopy of a photocopy of a neo-noir tale. It is a fantastic story in its own right, told with skill and verve, with deft plotting, and with a cast that cries out for a film adaptation or returning television series, such is the fullness of their backstories and the possibilities of where they could go in future.

The cover blurb for the novel states You’ll have to look twice at Tall Oaks. This is one of the best books I’ve read in a long old time, and I can imagine people returning to the place again and again.