Reblog: Rupture by Ragnar Jonasson – Reviewed by Chillers Killers and Thrillers

Reblog: Rupture by Ragnar Jonasson – Reviewed by Chillers Killers and Thrillers

Chillers Killers and Thrillers

Today I’m pleased to host a stop on the Rupture blog tour by Ragnar Jonasson. Rupture is the fourth novel in the Dark Iceland series published by Orenda Books and translated by Quentin Bates. The action of Rupture follows on from Blackout but before the events of Nightblind.

rupture-vis-4Now for the blurb:

1955.

Two young couples move to the uninhabited, isolated fjord of Hedinsfjörður. Their stay ends abruptly when one of the women meets her death in mysterious circumstances. The case is never solved. Fifty years later an old photograph comes to light, and it becomes clear that the couples may not have been alone on the fjord after all…
In nearby Siglufjörður, young policeman Ari Thór tries to piece together what really happened that fateful night, in a town where no one wants to know, where secrets are a way of life. He’s assisted by Ísrún, a news reporter…

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Reblog: A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart – Reviewed by Linda’s Book Bag

Reblog: A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart – Reviewed by Linda’s Book Bag

Linda's Book Bag

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It gives me great pleasure to be on the celebratory tour for a book, A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart, that I’ve adored reading. Published by Sphere, an imprint of Little Brown. A Boy Made of Blocks is available for purchase here.

A Boy Made of Blocks

a-boy-made-of-blocks

MEET THIRTY SOMETHING DAD, ALEX… He loves his wife Jody, but has forgotten how to show it. He loves his son Sam, but doesn’t understand him. Something has to change. And he needs to start with himself.

MEET EIGHT-YEAR-OLD SAM… To him the world is a puzzle he can’t solve on his own.

When Sam starts to play Minecraft, it opens up a place where Alex and Sam begin to rediscover both themselves and each other… When life starts to tear one family apart, can they put themselves back together, one piece at a time?

A Boy Made of Blocks is…

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Reblog: Perfect Remains by Helen Fields – Reviewed by Little Bookness Lane

Reblog: Perfect Remains by Helen Fields – Reviewed by Little Bookness Lane

Little Bookness Lane

Publisher: Avon Books UK

Publication date: 26th January 2017

perfect-remains-my-review

Perfectly acceptable reasons to love Perfect Remains:

perfect-remains-blk-coverAN AMBITIOUS ODDBALL with a CUNNING PLAN

Do you love to hate a deluded menace in pursuit of their warped personal goal?? Well this one’s a meticulous ploster with a talent for creeping people out without even trying. It’s always someone else’s fault of course, or so their conscience deceives them. They can’t quite grasp that the only reason people start to leave a room is because they’ve entered it. As you know their identity from the off you may be lulled into believing they’ve already done their worst – WRONG!

Interests include: Applying empathy in moderation, being ingratiating to a fault, discovering inventive methods of disposal, and amateur dentistry.

THE DETECTIVE INSPECTOR

Aaah. DI Luc Callanach. I suppose ought to explain why, hadn’t I? Okay, he’s an attractive Frenchman and has curiously exchanged Interpol for a Police Station…

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Reblog: Ledston Luck by Andrew Barrett – Reviewed by BYTHELETTERBOOKREVIEWS

Reblog: Ledston Luck by Andrew Barrett – Reviewed by BYTHELETTERBOOKREVIEWS

bytheletterbookreviews

33380318.jpgBook Description:

They say you can always trust a copper. They’re lying.
They lied thirty years ago and they’re still lying today.

A booby-trapped body in a long-abandoned chapel. A scene examination that goes horribly wrong. CSI Eddie Collins and DI Benson are injured and one of the team killed. Eddie is heartbroken and guilt-ridden. And angry.

If you like fast-paced crime thrillers with a forensic slant, raw emotions, and characters that reach out of the book and grab you by the throat, you’ll love Andrew Barrett’s Eddie Collins series.

My Thoughts:

Ledston Luck is the fourth book in the Eddie Collins series. It works really well as a stand alone but would advise reading the others if you want more of the main characters back ground.

Eddie Collins is one truly complex character. He seems to walk around with the weight of the world on his shoulders. He has so…

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Reblog: Her Every Fear by Peter Swanson – Reviewed by Barbara Copperthwaite

Reblog: Her Every Fear by Peter Swanson – Reviewed by Barbara Copperthwaite

Barbara Copperthwaite

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“Had me literally gasping out loud. Read this book!”

THEY SAY

Following a brutal attack by her ex-boyfriend, Kate Priddy makes an uncharacteristically bold decision after her cousin, Corbin Dell, suggests a temporary apartment swap – and she moves from London to Boston.

But soon after her arrival Kate makes a shocking discovery: Corbin’s next-door neighbour, a young woman named Audrey Marshall, has been murdered. When the police begin asking questions about Corbin’s relationship with Audrey, and his neighbours come forward with their own suspicions, a shaken Kate has few answers, and many questions of her own.

Jetlagged and emotionally unstable, her imagination playing out her every fear, Kate can barely trust herself. so how can she trust any of the strangers she’s just met?

In the tradition of such greats as Gillian Flynn and Harlan Coben, Patricia Highsmith and James M. Cain, Her Every Fear is a scintillating novel…

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Reblog: Little Girl Lost by Carol Wyer – Reviewed by The Quiet Knitter

Reblog: Little Girl Lost by Carol Wyer – Reviewed by The Quiet Knitter

The Quiet Knitter

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Published: 19 January 2017
Reviewed: 13 January 2017

5 out of 5 stars

Copy provided by Bookouture

Description:

A perfect family hiding disturbing secrets. A killer who wants the truth to be told.

A teacher goes missing under suspicious circumstances.
A millionaire is murdered at a local reservoir.
For Detective Robyn Carter, there’s no obvious link between the men. But as she starts to delve into the cases, her investigations lead her to Abigail, perfect wife and mother to beautiful little Izzy. What was Abigail’s connection to the victims? And why is she receiving threatening messages from an anonymous number?

But as Robyn starts to inch closer to finding the killer, Izzy is abducted.

Unless Robyn gets to the twisted individual in time, a little girl will die …

My Thoughts & Review:

From the opening chapters the reader is plunged in to the dark and gritty world…

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Reblog: A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart – Reviewed by IF ONLY I COULD READ FASTER

Reblog: A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart – Reviewed by IF ONLY I COULD READ FASTER

If only I could read faster

aboymadeofblocks A Boy Made of Blogs by Keith Stuart.

Today is my stop on the blog tour for a very special book. A Boy Made of Blocks has been out for some time in eBook but the publishers are doing a tour to mark the release in paperback.

My 5* review:

It isn’t often that I give a book 5 stars when I nearly gave up reading it. When the book starts it seems like it is going to be very similar to another book, Shtum, a book that was ok but in my opinion (which seems different to many others), not great. I was not keen to read a book that was so alike. I kept going though and I’m so pleased that I did, sure it was a bit slow to get going but once I got into it I loved it.

A Boy Made of Blocks tells…

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Reblog: The Girl Before by J P Delaney – Reviewed by Wendy Unsworth

Reblog: The Girl Before by J P Delaney – Reviewed by Wendy Unsworth

Wendy Unsworth

img_1970It’s always great to read an intriguing premise, one that tells you that you have to read this book and that was how I felt when I first read the blurb for The Girl Before by J.P. Delaney.

A perfect house built by an architect who will accept nothing short of perfection, or at least his version of it. The house is available to rent but not just to anyone with the cash ( and this house is a bargain), applicants must fill in a lengthy questionnaire and be approved personally by the owner/designer Edward Monkford. And it doesn’t stop there, rules (over 200 of them) must be adhered to; no clutter, no pets, no children, very few possessions. The list goes on.

This concept sets up the initial intrigue of the story. Why would anyone agree to live under such rigid conditions? But then, Edward is an unusual and…

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Reblog: Lies by TM Logan – Reviewed by BIBLIOPHILE BOOK CLUB

Reblog: Lies by TM Logan – Reviewed by BIBLIOPHILE BOOK CLUB

Bibliophile Book Club

Hi everyone!

So today is my stop on the blog tour for Lies by TM Logan, which incidentally, is out today. I’ve got a great guest post from the author about his favourite opening lines, but more on that in a bit. Here’s all the important bookish info first:

About the book:

lies

When Joe Lynch stumbles across his wife driving into a hotel car park while she’s supposed to be at work, he’s intrigued enough to follow her in.
And when he witnesses her in an angry altercation with family friend Ben, he knows he ought to intervene.

But just as the confrontation between the two men turns violent, and Ben is knocked unconscious, Joe’s young son has an asthma attack – and Joe must flee in order to help him.

When he returns, desperate to make sure Ben is OK, Joe is horrified to find that Ben has disappeared.

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Reblog: A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart – Reviewed by The Quiet Knitter

Reblog: A Boy Made of Blocks by Keith Stuart – Reviewed by The Quiet Knitter

The Quiet Knitter

I am delighted to welcome you to my stop on the blog tour for Keith Stuart’s wonderful  novel “A Boy Made of Blocks” and share my review with you.

Description:

41frqz6l1cl-_sx315_bo1204203200_Discover a unique, funny and moving debut that will make you laugh, cry and smile.
Meet thirtysomething dad, Alex

He loves his wife Jody, but has forgotten how to show it. He loves his son Sam, but doesn’t understand him. Something has to change. And he needs to start with himself.
Meet eight-year-old Sam

Beautiful, surprising, autistic. To him the world is a puzzle he can’t solve on his own.
But when Sam starts to play Minecraft, it opens up a place where Alex and Sam begin to rediscover both themselves and each other . . .
Can one fragmented family put themselves back together, one piece at a time?
Inspired by the author’s experiences with his own son, A…

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Reblog: The One by John Marrs – Reviewed by Chillers Killers and Thrillers

Reblog: The One by John Marrs – Reviewed by Chillers Killers and Thrillers

Chillers Killers and Thrillers

Today I’m super thrilled to be a part of The One blog tour by John Marrs. I adored this book and cannot put into words how good it was, but will try along with a cheeky Q&A with the author. As always don’t forget to stop off at all the other stops on this blog tour – #MatchYourDNA

51hN4nfbjBL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgThe Blurb:

How far would you go to find THE ONE?

One simple mouth swab is all it takes. One tiny DNA test to find your perfect partner – the one you’re genetically made for. 

A decade after scientists discover everyone has a gene they share with just one person, millions have taken the test, desperate to find true love. Now, five more people take the test. But even soul mates have secrets. And some are more shocking – and deadlier – than others…

A psychological thriller with a difference, this is…

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